Bachelor Party Basics

Bachelor Party Basics

OK, so we know bachelor parties (more commonly known in the UK as stag do’s) have gotten a bad rap. The bachelor party began as a gentlemen’s party – a civilised evening of drawing-room drinking, smoking and toasting to the bride’s health. But boy, have things changed! Most of today’s bachelor parties have ditched the civilised bit in favour of a raunchy night on the town. If you’re looking for how to plan a bachelor party that will keep you out of, both prison and the doghouse, you’ve come to the right place.

Here are our bachelor party basics for the best man, guaranteed (well almost guaranteed) to get the groom back in one piece for his wedding day…

The Guest List

While there isn’t a set number of people you should invite, the guest list shouldn’t include 100 of the groom’s closest friends, nor should it include people who don’t get along – you don’t want any brawls! Also, make sure that all the guests are trusted friends who aren’t likely to drop the gory details to the bride on the eve on the wedding night!

The Location

Bachelor parties can take place almost anywhere. The typical bachelor party usually involves some combination of the following: booze, strippers, gambling (not necessarily in that order). But the trend these days is more towards the old-fashioned, a weekend spent bonding in the woods, for example. Others plan high-adrenaline adventures such as white-water rafting, skydiving, or rock climbing. Tamer bachelor parties might involve a round of golf and a nice steak dinner. If time is of the essence, then a local bar, hotel penthouse suite, or the best man’s apartment are fine bachelor party locales. Remember to always keep the groom in mind… As best man, there is no doubt that you know the groom best, so think about what he would most want to do.

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Time It Right

If you think the night before the wedding is the perfect time for a bachelor bash, think again. The last thing the nervous groom needs on the big day is a hangover. Plus a big night on the town before the walk down the aisle will surely stress the bride out (which is to be avoided). You should schedule the main event up to a month before the wedding or at the very least, the weekend before. Send out invitations or call invitees at least three weeks before the party, the out-of-towners in particular will appreciate the advance ‘warning’.

And The Obvious…

Make sure people don’t drive home drunk – hire a limo or car service for the night, have a designated driver or make sure everyone takes a cab. To ensure everyone gets home safely, bring extra cash with you, just in case!

Pay attention to the groom. Some people love to humiliate and tease the groom at the bachelor party, often getting him drunk, taking incriminating photos of him and shaving off his eyebrows (this never goes down well with the bride). Whether or not you get involved in these antics is entirely up to you, but when the groom says “stop!”, it means stop.

Don’t forget the camera, but it’s wise to have all risqu?� pics approved by the groom, before uploading to Facebook.

Once you’ve finished planning a bachelor bash to remember (following our careful steps), give yourself a pat on the back for all your hard work and don’t forget to HAVE FUN!!!

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